It’s an ethical grey area but could natural insemination lead to a better chance of pregnancy?

Natural insemination or NI is exactly what it sounds like. The old-fashioned way of getting pregnant; sex with a partner. But for many women trying to get pregnant either as a single woman or as part of a couple, this isn’t someone they have been in a romantic relationship with for years. This is a friend, an acquaintance or often a donor they connected with online. Many claim that natural insemination offers the best chance of conception, but is there any proof to these claims? And are there any other points to consider before choosing natural insemination?

Temperature measurement to prepare a natural insemination

Does natural insemination really improve the chances of pregnancy?

There are lots of claims floating around online that natural insemination offers the best chance of pregnancy. With some citing a three-times greater chance of pregnancy from natural (rather than artificial) insemination. And at first glance, this seems to make sense. After all, this is how humans are designed to make babies. But there are few studies to support this hypothesis. In fact, most of the studies on natural vs artificial insemination have been done on animals. So, although natural insemination may lead to better results, we just can’t prove it right now.

Could donors have an alternate motive?

This is where natural insemination gets difficult. Obtaining a sperm sample from a stranger on the internet for artificial home insemination is one thing. Meeting up with them for sex is quite another. And there are likely some unscrupulous donors looking to take advantage of the situation. For some people this idea is strange and invasive, not to mention it can come with a significant risk factor. If you do choose natural insemination, then you should ensure the meeting takes place in a safe place and that someone knows where you are and who you are with.

Does natural insemination have any legal implications?

In most countries, conception by natural insemination infers an immediate legal and parental responsibility on the biological father, whatever the intentions of both partners. This can make it a very risky choice for both the parent and the donor, particularly if they don’t intend to have contact after conception.

Is natural insemination cheating?

For women who are already in a relationship, looking for a donor via natural insemination can feel like an emotional and physical betrayal of their current partner. This isn’t the same for everyone but it’s certainly something you should discuss at length with your significant other before deciding to go ahead.

What about sexually transmitted diseases?

Just like artificial insemination, natural insemination can cause the spread of sexually transmitted diseases. In fact, it carries a higher risk than artificial insemination. Both the potential mother and the donor should have up to date health checks, including STI checks before proceeding with natural insemination.

How can I improve my chances of conception with natural insemination?

To get pregnant the donor sperm needs to come into contact with your egg. This means having sex one to three days before ovulation at the earliest and being aware of your personal fertility window. After intercourse, you can also improve the chances of becoming pregnant by lying down with your hips elevated on a pillow for around 30 minutes after sex.

Do what feels right for you

Whatever your views on natural insemination, it is certainly a decision that requires careful consideration before going ahead. You need to be sure that this method is something you can physically and emotionally accept, as well as understanding the legal implications of natural conception. If you do decide to go ahead, choose the donor carefully and be aware of potential donors out there who are pursuing natural insemination for the wrong reasons. If it still feels like natural insemination is the best and most natural fit for you, go for it – just take care to proceed with caution.